When you buy cialis, is this like buying an aphrodisiac?

It's almost impossible to separate sex from psychology. When all is working well, self-esteem and confidence are at high levels. When things are not working so well, this undermines confidence and many feel depressed. If the problems persist, the depression can become severe. There are a range of fancy words that are paraded out at this point: impotence, erectile dysfunction, libido, and so on. The precise details of the physical difficulties also vary. A man may find it difficult or impossible to get an erection, or a hard erection may disappear suddenly during sexual activity, or there may be premature ejaculation, and so on. It's convenient to group all the different forms of failure under one label. But this depersonalizes the problem. Instead of seeing it as "your" problem, doctors start talking about general trends and how the majority can be treated. When you want someone to pay attention to your situation, you find people talking about you as if you are not in the room or talking in generalities. So let's avoid all this slightly embarrassed discussion and get down to basics.

In some cultures, men who have sexual difficulties rely on traditional remedies. These substances are called aphrodisiacs - the word coming from Aphrodite who, in ancient Greece, was the Goddess of Love - and they are believed to improve sexual desire and performance. Examples range from herbs, the powdered horns of large animals to preparations made from beetles and insects. In the majority of cases, these have no physical effect on the body but, because they are recommended by respected authority figures in the local society, the affected men usually find them effective. This goes to prove the general rule that, if the mind is willing, the body responds. The medical profession calls this the "placebo effect".

There are three prescription only medications on the market to treat erectile dysfunction. Chemically, they all rely on the same basic active ingredients and work in the same way. Recently, the American College of Physicians asked the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to find out whether there was any evidence to show that one was more effective than the other two. There have only been four clinical trials making a direct comparison between the three and 122 trials studying the drugs individually. The conclusion was that the three drugs are broadly similar in their levels of effectiveness and safety. But the majority of men preferred one of the drugs because, in one form, it produces thirty-six hours of sexual potency. In the once-daily form, men taking the drug have levels of response broadly the same as "normal" men who have not been affected by erectile dysfunction. Thus, in terms of convenience and effect, an increasing majority of men prefer to buy cialis. However, this system of recommendation and sale by word-of-mouth, is exactly the same as the process for selling oysters as an aphrodisiac. Merely suggesting that oysters give you great sex sells them. It's the same with drugs. If men are recommended one drug and they have a good experience with it, they may never try the others. Trusting the product to give a known result creates buying habits. In this instance, unlike oysters, cialis has a very precise physical effect which gives sexual responsiveness. Comparing it to an aphrodisiac for marketing purposes is fair. Otherwise, you can trust cialis to work, no matter what others may tell you.

0 comments:

Followers

About This Blog

Traffic

  © Blogger templates The Professional Template by Ourblogtemplates.com 2008

Back to TOP